Journal Article

Etiologic Diagnosis of Infective Endocarditis by Broad-Range Polymerase Chain Reaction: A 3-Year Experience

Philipp Peter Bosshard, Andreas Kronenberg, Reinhard Zbinden, Christian Ruef, Erik Christian Böttger and Martin Altwegg

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 37, issue 2, pages 167-172
Published in print July 2003 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online July 2003 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/375592
Etiologic Diagnosis of Infective Endocarditis by Broad-Range Polymerase Chain Reaction: A 3-Year Experience

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Immunology
  • Public Health and Epidemiology
  • Microbiology

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

We analyzed surgically resected endocardial specimens from 49 patients by broad-range PCR. PCR results were compared with (1) results of previous blood cultures, (2) results of culture and Gram staining of resected specimens, and (3) clinical data (Duke criteria). Molecular analyses of resected specimens and previous blood cultures showed good overall agreement. However, in 18% of patients with sterile blood cultures, bacterial DNA was found in the resected materials. When data from patients with definite or rejected cases of infective endocarditis (IE) were included, the sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of broad-range PCR were 82.6%, 100%, 100%, and 76.5%, respectively, overall, and 94.1%, 100%, 100%, and 90%, for cases of native valve endocarditis. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of culture of resected specimens from patients with native valve endocarditis were 17.6%, 88.9%, 75%, and 36.4%. We recommend broad-range PCR of surgically resected endocardial material in cases of possible IE, in cases of suspected IE in which blood cultures are sterile, and in cases in which organisms grow in blood cultures but only Duke minor criteria are met. We propose to add molecular techniques to the pathologic criteria of the Duke classification scheme.

Journal Article.  3922 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.