Journal Article

Smallpox Vaccination: A Review, Part I. Background, Vaccination Technique, Normal Vaccination and Revaccination, and Expected Normal Reactions

Vincent A. Fulginiti, Arthur Papier, J. Michael Lane, John M. Neff, D. A. Henderson, Donald A. Henderson, Thomas V. Inglesby and Tara O'Toole

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 37, issue 2, pages 241-250
Published in print July 2003 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online July 2003 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/375824
Smallpox Vaccination: A Review, Part I. Background, Vaccination Technique, Normal Vaccination and Revaccination, and Expected Normal Reactions

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Because smallpox could be a factor in bioterrorism, the United States has provided guidelines for smallpox vaccination of certain members of the population, including health care workers and first responders, as well as military personnel. A plan for more extensive vaccination, if it is needed in the event of a bioterrorist attack, is being developed under the aegis of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The characteristics of smallpox vaccine, the technique of administration, and the expected reactions to primary vaccination and revaccination are outlined in this article.

Journal Article.  5947 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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