Journal Article

Opiate Drug Use: A Potential Contributor to the Endocrine and Metabolic Complications in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Disease

Odelia B. Cooper, Todd T. Brown and Adrian S. Dobs

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 37, issue Supplement_2, pages S132-S136
Published in print September 2003 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online September 2003 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/375879
Opiate Drug Use: A Potential Contributor to the Endocrine and Metabolic Complications in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Disease

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Endocrine and metabolic abnormalities are common in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease and have been attributed to both the disease and its treatment. Other risk factors and behaviors may also be important. Approximately 28% of new HIV infections occur in users of injection drugs, such as opiates. We focus on the effects of opiates on multiple endocrine systems and their potential to contribute to the metabolic and endocrine problems in HIV. Opiate use has been associated with hypogonadism, adrenal dysfunction, reduced bone mineral density, and growth-hormone abnormalities. In addition, some studies have suggested abnormalities in glucose and lipid metabolism among opiate users. Although much of the evidence should be viewed as preliminary, these potential abnormalities should be kept in mind when treating opiate-dependent patients infected with HIV.

Journal Article.  3790 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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