Journal Article

Interventions for Visceral Adiposity Associated with Human Immunodeficiency Virus: Application of a Method for Assessing Efficacy

Engelson Ellen S.

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 37, issue Supplement_2, pages S96-S100
Published in print September 2003 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online September 2003 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/375880
Interventions for Visceral Adiposity Associated with Human Immunodeficiency Virus: Application of a Method for Assessing Efficacy

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Immunology
  • Public Health and Epidemiology
  • Microbiology

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

In addition to lipoatrophy of the subcutaneous fat compartment and lipohypertrophy of the breasts and dorsocervical fat pad, excess visceral fat is considered to be part of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–associated lipodystrophy. Because of associations between visceral adiposity and atherosclerotic risk and undesirable clinical and psychological effects, therapies for this morphological alteration are under investigation. The non-HIV literature on the visceral fat effects of various weight-reduction methods provides some insight into the difficulty that lies ahead. We demonstrate the application of a method published by Smith and Zachwieja to 3 studies of HIV that resulted in a significant loss of body fat. The method is meant to control for differences in the initial amount of visceral fat per subcutaneous fat and for absolute weight change. The results show that the body composition differences in HIV may require the development and application of a new method that permits wider variation in fat distribution.

Journal Article.  2299 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.