Journal Article

Overweight and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Progression in Women: Associations HIV Disease Progression and Changes in Body Mass Index in Women in the HIV Epidemiology Research Study Cohort

Clara Y. Jones, Joseph W. Hogan, Brad Snyder, Robert S. Klein, Anne Rompalo, Paula Schuman and Charles C. Carpenter

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 37, issue Supplement_2, pages S69-S80
Published in print September 2003 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online September 2003 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/375889
Overweight and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Progression in Women: Associations HIV Disease Progression and Changes in Body Mass Index in Women in the HIV Epidemiology Research Study Cohort

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An association of increased weight with a slower progression of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease has been reported in studies that have not included large numbers of women. We evaluated the association of HIV disease progression with body mass index (BMI) in 871 women and present cross-sectional, survival, and longitudinal analyses. A higher baseline BMI was associated with a lower rate of occurrence of the first CD4 cell count <200 cells/mm3. In analyses that incorporated time-varying BMI, underweight and normal women had an increased risk of clinical acquired immune deficiency syndrome, and underweight women had increased risk of HIV-related death, compared with obese women. The association between change in BMI and CD4 cell count was estimated; increases in BMI were associated with slight increases in CD4 cell counts, even after controlling for prior values of CD4 cell count, viral load, and treatment. Higher BMI and increases in BMI are associated with a decreased risk of HIV progression.

Journal Article.  5792 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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