Journal Article

Increased Prevalence of Hypothyroidism among Human Immunodeficiency Virus—Infected Patients: A Need for Screening

Sonia Beltran, François-Xavier Lescure, Rachel Desailloud, Youcef Douadi, Amar Smail, Isabelle El Esper, Sylvie Arlot and Jean-Luc Schmit

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 37, issue 4, pages 579-583
Published in print August 2003 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online August 2003 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/376626
Increased Prevalence of Hypothyroidism among Human Immunodeficiency Virus—Infected Patients: A Need for Screening

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The aim of this cross-sectional multicenter study was to determine the prevalence of and risk factors for hypothyroidism in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)—infected patients. Free T4, free T3, and thyroid-stimulating hormone levels were determined. Data on age, sex, weight variation, smoking status, duration of HIV infection, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention disease stage, CD4 cell count, HIV RNA load, lipodystrophy, HIV—hepatitis C virus coinfection, and antiretroviral treatment (type of drugs and total cumulative dose) were collected. The prevalence study included 350 HIV-infected patients. Sixteen percent of patients had hypothyroidism: 2.6% had overt hypothyroidism, 6.6% had subclinical hypothyroidism, and 6.8% had a low free T4 level. The prevalence of subclinical hypothyroidism was higher among HIV-infected men than among HIV-infected women. A case-control study was conducted that compared hypothyroid (n = 56) and euthyroid (n = 287) patients. In the multivariate analysis, receipt of stavudine and low CD4 cell count were associated with hypothyroidism. Therefore, screening may be indicated for patients, especially men, who have received stavudine or have decreased CD4 cell counts.

Journal Article.  2679 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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