Journal Article

Fatal Human Rabies Caused by European Bat Lyssavirus Type 2a Infection in Scotland

D. Nathwani, P. G. McIntyre, K. White, A. J. Shearer, N. Reynolds, D. Walker, G. V. Orange and A. R. Fooks

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 37, issue 4, pages 598-601
Published in print August 2003 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online August 2003 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/376641
Fatal Human Rabies Caused by European Bat Lyssavirus Type 2a Infection in Scotland

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We wish to report the first recorded case of indigenous human rabies caused by a bat bite in the United Kingdom in 100 years. This instructive case report highlights a number of key lessons: first, bites from insectivorous bats indiginous to the United Kingdom can cause rabies in humans; second, rabies immunization is essential for bat-handlers, and postexposure treatment for rabies is essential for patients bitten by bats; third, patients able to give a history who present with acute flaccid paralysis and/or presumptive viral encephalitis should be asked if they have been bitten by bats, irrespective of travel history, or this history should be obtained from family or friends; fourth, antemortem diagnosis of bat rabies (EBLV type 2a infection) in humans is possible using RT-PCR.

Journal Article.  2209 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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