Journal Article

Implications of Anemia in Human Immunodeficiency Virus, Cancer, and Hepatitis C Virus

Donna Mildvan

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 37, issue Supplement_4, pages S293-S296
Published in print November 2003 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online November 2003 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/376908
Implications of Anemia in Human Immunodeficiency Virus, Cancer, and Hepatitis C Virus

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Anemia is a multifactorial problem in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, cancer, and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. New insights regarding anemia symptoms and quality of life (QOL) have prompted reassessment of traditional triggers for anemia treatment to increase hemoglobin (Hb) and improve QOL. In HIV-positive patients, anemia is independently associated with disease progression and survival. Many HIV-positive patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) still develop mild to moderate anemia and associated QOL impairment. Epoetin alfa effectively increases Hb and improves QOL in these patients. Many HIV-positive patients are coinfected with HCV. Standard HCV therapy (interferon alfa/ribavirin) can cause anemia that may result in treatment alterations and compromised virologic outcome. Epoetin alfa therapy in anemic HCV patients increases Hb levels and may provide other benefits. Neuroprotective effects of epoetin alfa in preclinical models of central nervous system disorders have recently been demonstrated, implying a new therapeutic role for this cytokine.

Journal Article.  2963 words. 

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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