Journal Article

Epidemiological, Clinical, and Prognostic Differences between the Diseases Caused by <i>Mycobacterium kansasii</i> and <i>Mycobacterium tuberculosis</i> in Patients Infected with Human Immunodeficiency Virus: A Multicenter Study

Jesús Canueto-Quintero, Francisco Javier Caballero-Granado, Marta Herrero-Romero, Angel Domínguez-Castellano, Patricia Martín-Rico, Elisa Vidal Verdú, Daniel Selma Santamaría, Ricardo Creagh Cerquera and Manuel Torres-Tortosa

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 37, issue 4, pages 584-590
Published in print August 2003 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online August 2003 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/376987
Epidemiological, Clinical, and Prognostic Differences between the Diseases Caused by Mycobacterium kansasii and Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Patients Infected with Human Immunodeficiency Virus: A Multicenter Study

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A multicenter, comparative study was performed to determine the epidemiological, clinical, and prognostic differences between the diseases caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium kansasii in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–infected patients. From 1 January 1995 through 31 December 1999, 25 HIV-infected patients received diagnoses of M. kansasii infection, and another 75 were selected as control subjects from among patients who had M. tuberculosis infection. Variables associated with M. tuberculosis disease in the multivariate analysis were previous intravenous drug use (odds ratio [OR], 8; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.5–41.4) and interstitial radiologic pattern (OR, 12.7; 95% CI, 1.7–94.3). Variables associated with M. kansasii were previous diagnosis of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (OR, 15.8; 95% CI, 4.2–59.6) and concomitant opportunistic infections (OR, 14.2; 95% CI, 2–105.7). Clinical and radiologic features were similar for both groups, but epidemiological characteristics and prognosis were different. M. kansasii disease was associated more closely with level of immunosuppression and progression of HIV infection than was disease caused by M. tuberculosis.

Journal Article.  4072 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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