Journal Article

<i>Pseudomonas aeruginosa</i> Bacteremia: Risk Factors for Mortality and Influence of Delayed Receipt of Effective Antimicrobial Therapy on Clinical Outcome

Cheol-In Kang, Sung-Han Kim, Hong-Bin Kim, Sang-Won Park, Young-Ju Choe, Myoung-don Oh, Eui-Chong Kim and Kang-Won Choe

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 37, issue 6, pages 745-751
Published in print September 2003 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online September 2003 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/377200
Pseudomonas aeruginosa Bacteremia: Risk Factors for Mortality and Influence of Delayed Receipt of Effective Antimicrobial Therapy on Clinical Outcome

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Immunology
  • Public Health and Epidemiology
  • Microbiology

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

Among the nosocomial pathogens, Pseudomonas aeruginosa is recognized as a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Data on 136 patients with P. aeruginosa bacteremia were retrospectively analyzed to evaluate risk factors for mortality. The median age of the patients was 55 years (range, 15–85 years), 78.7% of the cases were hospital-acquired, and the 30-day mortality rate was 39% (53 of 136 patients). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that risk factors for mortality included severe sepsis, pneumonia, delay in starting effective antimicrobial therapy, and an increasing APACHE II score (all P values <.05). In 123 of the 136 patients (excluding 13 patients treated with inadequate definitive antibiotics), 30-day mortality was 27.7% (13 of 47 patients) in the group of patients who received initially effective empirical antimicrobial therapy, and 43.4% (33 of 76) in the group of patients who received delayed effective antimicrobial therapy (P = .079). There was a trend toward higher mortality as the length of delay increased. Delay in starting effective antimicrobial therapy for P. aeruginosa bacteremia tended to be associated with higher mortality.

Journal Article.  3778 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.