Journal Article

Epidemiological Comparison of True Methicillin-Resistant and Methicillin-Susceptible Coagulase-Negative Staphylococcal Bacteremia at Hospital Admission

Evelina Tacconelli, Erika M. C. D'Agata and Adolf W. Karchmer

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 37, issue 5, pages 644-649
Published in print September 2003 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online September 2003 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/377207
Epidemiological Comparison of True Methicillin-Resistant and Methicillin-Susceptible Coagulase-Negative Staphylococcal Bacteremia at Hospital Admission

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We performed 2 case-control studies among 108 patients with true coagulase-negative staphylococcal (CoNS) bacteremia diagnosed within 48 h of hospital admission. Seventy-nine patients (73%) with methicillin-resistant (MR) CoNS bacteremia and 29 patients (27%) with methicillin-susceptible (MS) CoNS bacteremia were compared with 79 randomly selected control patients without CoNS bacteremia. The presence of a central venous catheter was an independent risk factor for both MR- and MS-CoNS bacteremia (P < .001). Patients with MR-CoNS bacteremia were more frequently admitted from health care facilities (P = .02), more likely to have had previous MR Staphylococcus aureus infection or colonization (P = .02), and more likely to have received antibiotics in the previous 30 days (P = .02). The probability that bacteremia was caused by an MR strain, rather than an MS strain, was 62% among patients admitted from the community and 84% among patients admitted from health care facilities. This study identified epidemiological characteristics that can be used to distinguish between MR- and MS-CoNS bacteremia and found high rates of methicillin resistance among CoNS isolates recovered from patients admitted from the community, as well as from health care facilities.

Journal Article.  3340 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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