Journal Article

Seroepidemiology of <i>Helicobacter pylori</i> and Hepatitis A Virus and the Mode of Transmission of Infection: A 9-Year Cohort Study in Rural Japan

Hoda M. Malaty, Eiji Tanaka, Toshiko Kumagai, Hiroyoshi Ota, Kendo Kiyosawa, David Y. Graham and Tsutomu Katsuyama

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 37, issue 8, pages 1067-1072
Published in print October 2003 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online October 2003 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/378276
Seroepidemiology of Helicobacter pylori and Hepatitis A Virus and the Mode of Transmission of Infection: A 9-Year Cohort Study in Rural Japan

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We compared the seroepidemiologic patterns of Helicobacter pylori and hepatitis A virus (HAV) infections among participants in 2 independent cross-sectional studies conducted in Japan in 1986 and 1994. Subgroups were monitored with successive blood sampling. H. pylori and HAV infection status was defined by results of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In 1986, the prevalence of H. pylori infection and HAV infection, respectively, were 80% and 70% among adults and 31% and 5% among children. The prevalence of both infections increased with age. Concordant infections were found in 74.5% of adults (κ = 0.2) versus 2% of children (κ = 0.05). During the 9-year study period, the incidence of H. pylori infection was 1.1% among adults and 2% among children. The seroprevalence of HAV remained constant. The disparity between the increase in prevalence of H. pylori and HAV infection with age is likely associated with improvements in hygienic practices. The discordance between the presence of the infections among younger persons is evidence against a common source and/or vehicle for transmission.

Journal Article.  3647 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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