Journal Article

Severe <i>Staphylococcus aureus</i> Infections Caused by Clonally Related Community-Acquired Methicillin-Susceptible and Methicillin-Resistant Isolates

Kanokporn Mongkolrattanothai, Susan Boyle, Madelyn D. Kahana and Robert S. Daum

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 37, issue 8, pages 1050-1058
Published in print October 2003 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online October 2003 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1086/378277
Severe Staphylococcus aureus Infections Caused by Clonally Related Community-Acquired Methicillin-Susceptible and Methicillin-Resistant Isolates

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We investigated the genetic relatedness of 5 community-acquired (CA) Staphylococcus aureus isolates obtained from 4 consecutive pediatric patients presenting with sepsis syndrome and severe pneumonia during a 3-week period in 2000. Two patients were infected with methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA), and 2 were infected with methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). The pulsed-field gel electrophoresis patterns for the 2 CA-MRSA isolates were identical to each other, as were the patterns for the 3 CA-MSSA isolates. A 2-band difference reflecting the presence of a staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) element distinguished the CA-MRSA isolates from the CA-MSSA isolates. The small, mobile type IV SCCmec element was present in the CA-MRSA isolates. These data suggest that an insertion or, less likely, a deletion of the SCCmec type IV element occurred in a highly virulent S. aureus background. Staphylococcal toxin genes sea, seh, lukS-PV, and lukF-PV were detected in all isolates. Also, in all isolates, was a partial homolog of seo (seo′). The relationship among these patient isolates strengthens the assumption that CA-MRSA infections may be caused by isolates closely related to MSSA isolates.

Journal Article.  5194 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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