Journal Article

Macrolide-Resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae in Community-Acquired Pneumonia: Clinical and Microbiological Outcomes for Patients Treated with Levofloxacin

J. B. Kahn, B. A. Wiesinger and J. Xiang

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 38, issue Supplement_1, pages S24-S33
Published in print January 2004 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online January 2004 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/378407
Macrolide-Resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae in Community-Acquired Pneumonia: Clinical and Microbiological Outcomes for Patients Treated with Levofloxacin

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The rapid emergence and increasing prevalence of antimicrobial resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae have greatly complicated the choice of empirical treatment forcommunity-acquired pneumonia (CAP). The newer macrolides, azithromycin and clarithromycin, have been popular choices for empirical therapy because of their activity against the common pathogens responsible for CAP and their improved tolerability, compared with that of erythromycin. Unfortunately, rates of resistance of S. pneumoniae to the macrolide class of antimicrobials have increased steadily during the past decade and have reached 40% in certain areas of the United States. Although the clinical relevance of macrolide-resistant strains of S. pneumoniae has been questioned, break through bacteremias and clinical failures have been reported among patients receiving macrolide therapy. Were viewed the levofloxacin clinical database to determine the clinical and microbiological outcomes for patients with CAP infected with macrolide-resistant S. pneumoniae. Levofloxacin, including the 750-mg short-course regimen currently under investigation, produced a successful clinical response in 96.9% of patients with CAP due to macrolide-resistant S. pneumoniae, compared with 95.1% of all patients.

Journal Article.  6748 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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