Journal Article

Attributable Mortality of Nosocomial Candidemia, Revisited

Olafur Gudlaugsson, Shane Gillespie, Kathleen Lee, Jeff Vande Berg, Jianfang Hu, Shawn Messer, Loreen Herwaldt, Michael Pfaller and Daniel Diekema

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 37, issue 9, pages 1172-1177
Published in print November 2003 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online November 2003 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/378745
Attributable Mortality of Nosocomial Candidemia, Revisited

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We reexamined the attributable mortality of nosocomial candidemia 15 years after a retrospective cohort study performed at our hospital demonstrated an attributable mortality of 38%. For all episodes of nosocomial candidemia between 1 July 1997 and 30 June 2001, we matched control patients with case patients by age, sex, date of hospital admission, underlying disease(s), length of time at risk, and surgical procedure(s). We analyzed 108 matched pairs. There were no statistically significant differences in age, sex, underlying disease(s), time at risk, surgical procedure, or vital signs at admission between cases and controls. The crude mortality among case patients was 61% (66 of 108 patients), compared with 12% (13 of 108) among control patients, for an attributable mortality of 49% (95% CI, 38%–60%). Nosocomial candidemia is still associated with an extremely high crude and attributable mortality—much higher than that expected from underlying disease alone.

Journal Article.  3633 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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