Journal Article

Gatifloxacin, Gemifloxacin, and Moxifloxacin: The Role of 3 Newer Fluoroquinolones

Louis D. Saravolatz and James Leggett

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 37, issue 9, pages 1210-1215
Published in print November 2003 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online November 2003 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/378809
Gatifloxacin, Gemifloxacin, and Moxifloxacin: The Role of 3 Newer Fluoroquinolones

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Gatifloxacin, gemifloxacin, and moxifloxacin are the newest fluoroquinolones and show excellent in vitro activity against a wide variety of respiratory tract pathogens, many gram-negative aerobic organisms, and Bacteroides fragilis. These agents may be administered as oral and/or intravenous formulations with excellent bioavailability. The pharmacodynamics of these 3 new fluoroquinolones is more favorable than that of levofloxacin or ciprofloxacin for Streptococcus pneumoniae. All 3 agents are approved for the treatment of acute exacerbation of chronic bronchitis and community-acquired pneumonia. In addition, gatifloxacin and moxifloxacin are approved for the treatment of sinusitis. The toxicity of these 3 agents appears to be similar to that of the other fluoroquinolones in terms of gastrointestinal and central nervous system disturbances. All 3 agents have a low risk of phototoxicity, but gemifloxacin is associated with an increased risk of skin rash that is not a photoreaction. These agents can be useful for treatment of bacterial respiratory tract infections in patients who are allergic to β-lactams, but caution must be exercised to avoid the potential for selection of widespread resistance, which may occur with indiscriminate use.

Journal Article.  3228 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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