Journal Article

Atovaquone and Proguanil versus Amodiaquine for the Treatment of <i>Plasmodium falciparum</i> Malaria in African Infants and Young Children

Steffen Borrmann, Jean-François Faucher, Thierry Bagaphou, Michel A. Missinou, Ronald K. Binder, Sophia Pabisch, Philipp Rezbach, Pierre-Blaise Matsiegui, Bertrand Lell, Gerri Miller and Peter G. Kremsner

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 37, issue 11, pages 1441-1447
Published in print December 2003 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online December 2003 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/379014
Atovaquone and Proguanil versus Amodiaquine for the Treatment of Plasmodium falciparum Malaria in African Infants and Young Children

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Malaria-related morbidity and mortality are greatest among young children in areas with high malaria transmission intensity. An open-label, randomized study was done to evaluate the efficacy and safety of the combination of atovaquone and proguanil formulated as pediatric-strength tablets (20 and 8 mg/kg of body weight, respectively, administered once daily for 3 days), compared with amodiaquine (10 mg/kg of body weight, once daily for 3 days), among children weighing ⩾5 and <11 kg in Gabon. Two hundred patients aged 3–43 months were recruited. Use of atovaquone/proguanil resulted in a cure rate on day 28 of 95% (87 of 92 children), compared with 53% (41 of 78 children) for amodiaquine (difference, 42%; 95% CI, 30%–54%; P < .001). The incidence of adverse events was similar in both groups, and no serious adverse events were attributed to the use of atovaquone/proguanil. Atovaquone/proguanil was found to be highly effective and safe for the treatment of Plasmodium falciparum malaria in infants and young children weighing 5–10 kg in Africa.

Journal Article.  3787 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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