Journal Article

Once-Weekly Dalbavancin versus Standard-of-Care Antimicrobial Regimens for Treatment of Skin and Soft-Tissue Infections

Elyse Seltzer, Mary Beth Dorr, Beth P. Goldstein, Marc Perry, James A. Dowell and Tim Henkel

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 37, issue 10, pages 1298-1303
Published in print November 2003 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online November 2003 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/379015
Once-Weekly Dalbavancin versus Standard-of-Care Antimicrobial Regimens for Treatment of Skin and Soft-Tissue Infections

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Immunology
  • Public Health and Epidemiology
  • Microbiology

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

Dalbavancin, a novel glycopeptide with a long elimination half-life (∼9–12 days), was compared to standard antimicrobial therapy for skin and soft-tissue infections (SSTIs). In a randomized, controlled, open-label, phase 2 proof-of-concept trial, adults received 1100 mg of dalbavancin (as a single intravenous infusion), 1000 mg of dalbavancin intravenously and then 500 mg intravenously 1 week later, or a prospectively defined standard-of-care regimen. A gram-positive pathogen was isolated from samples obtained from 41 (66%) of 62 patients at baseline; Staphylococcus aureus was the most prevalent species (83% of pathogens). Clinical success rates at a follow-up visit (test of cure) were 94.1% among patients treated with 2 doses of dalbavancin, 61.5% among patients treated with 1 dose of dalbavancin, and 76.2% among patients treated with a standard-of-care regimen. All treatment regimens were well tolerated; drug-related adverse reaction rates were similar across the 3 groups. These findings suggest that a regimen of 2 doses of dalbavancin administered 1 week apart is effective in the treatment of complicated, gram-positive bacterial SSTIs and warrants further study.

Journal Article.  3627 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.