Journal Article

Epidemiologic Investigation of a Restaurant-Associated Outbreak of Pontiac Fever

Timothy F. Jones, Robert F. Benson, Ellen W. Brown, Jerry R. Rowland, Steven C. Crosier and William Schaffner

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 37, issue 10, pages 1292-1297
Published in print November 2003 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online November 2003 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/379017
Epidemiologic Investigation of a Restaurant-Associated Outbreak of Pontiac Fever

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This case-control study investigated a cluster of respiratory illness among patrons of a restaurant. Of 173 patrons interviewed, 117 (68%) were ill. Symptoms included myalgias (93%), headache (87%), and fatigue (79%). The mean incubation period was 49 h and the mean duration of illness was 71 h. Patrons aged >15 years were more likely to have been ill than younger patrons (odds ratio [OR], 2.96; P = .002); 58% of persons who were ill sat near a large fountain, compared with 18% of respondents who were not ill (OR, 7.5; P = .005). Legionella anisa was cultured from water samples obtained from the fountain pool. Of 22 individuals who were ill, 11 (50%) had a ⩾4-fold increase in the titer of antibody to that strain of L. anisa from acute-phase to convalescent-phase serum samples; 3 others (14%) had persistently elevated titers of ⩾512; of a group of 20 individuals who had not been exposed to the restaurant, none had titers of >128. Pontiac fever should be considered as a diagnosis during acute outbreaks of influenza-like illness with a high attack rate and no other identified etiology.

Journal Article.  3941 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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