Journal Article

Fluoroquinolone Resistance in Patients with Newly Diagnosed Tuberculosis

Amy Sarah Ginsburg, Nancy Hooper, Nikki Parrish, Kelly E. Dooley, Susan E. Dorman, Jay Booth, Marie Diener-West, William G. Merz, William R. Bishai and Timothy R. Sterling

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 37, issue 11, pages 1448-1452
Published in print December 2003 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online December 2003 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/379328
Fluoroquinolone Resistance in Patients with Newly Diagnosed Tuberculosis

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Immunology
  • Public Health and Epidemiology
  • Microbiology

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

Fluoroquinolones are widely used for the treatment of bacterial infections and are also second-line therapy for tuberculosis. However, fluoroquinolone resistance in patients with newly diagnosed cases of tuberculosis is not routinely assessed. We performed in vitro susceptibility testing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis to fluoroquinolones for all culture-confirmed tuberculosis cases in adults that were diagnosed at Johns Hopkins Hospital (Baltimore) between January 1998 and March 2002. Fifty-five patients were included in the study; 19 received fluoroquinolone monotherapy before the initiation of antituberculosis therapy. Two of 55 M. tuberculosis isolates (4%; 95% CI, 1%–13%) had decreased susceptibility to fluoroquinolones, including 2 of 19 of those from patients who had received fluoroquinolones (11%; 95% CI, 1%–33%) and 0 of 36 isolates from those who had not (95% CI, 0%–10%). The 2 fluoroquinolone-resistant M. tuberculosis strains were both from patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and a CD4+ lymphocyte count of <50 cells/mm3. The incidence of M. tuberculosis fluoroquinolone resistance in this small sample of patients with newly diagnosed tuberculosis was high, particularly among patients with prior fluoroquinolone exposure.

Journal Article.  3112 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.