Journal Article

Decreased Serum Opsonic Activity against <i>Streptococcus pneumoniae</i> in Human Immunodeficiency Virus—Infected Ugandan Adults

Hidehiko Takahashi, Kazunori Oishi, Hiroyuki Yoshimine, Atsushi Kumatori, Kazuhiko Moji, Kiwao Watanabe, Hawa Nalwoga, Sitefano Buguruka Tugume, Anthony Kebba, Roy Mugerwa, Peter Mugyenyi and Tsuyoshi Nagatake

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 37, issue 11, pages 1534-1540
Published in print December 2003 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online December 2003 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/379511
Decreased Serum Opsonic Activity against Streptococcus pneumoniae in Human Immunodeficiency Virus—Infected Ugandan Adults

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Type-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) to pneumococcal capsular polysaccharide (CPS) and opsonic activity against Streptococcus pneumoniae were evaluated in serum samples from 36 Ugandan adults with community-acquired pneumonia and 58 asymptomatic Ugandan adults with or without human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection. The levels of serum IgG to CPS were significantly higher in HIV-1–infected subjects than in HIV-uninfected subjects. Serum samples from HIV-1–infected subjects that had lower IgG titers demonstrated higher opsonic activity against type 3 (titers of 7) and type 9 (titers of 7–11) pneumococcal strains. Plasma HIV-1 load also correlated inversely with serum opsonic activity against these strains, and peripheral blood CD4+ lymphocyte numbers also tended to correlate with serum opsonic activity in asymptomatic HIV-1–infected adults. Our findings suggest that the opsonic activity of type-specific IgG is impaired in the serum of HIV-1–infected African adults, which may expose them to a serious risk of invasive pneumococcal infections.

Journal Article.  4067 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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