Journal Article

Clinical Features and Outcomes of Bacteremia Caused by <i>Enterococcus casseliflavus</i> and <i>Enterococcus gallinarum:</i> Analysis of 56 Cases

Sang-Ho Choi, Sang-Oh Lee, Tae Hyong Kim, Jin-Won Chung, Eun Ju Choo, Yee Gyung Kwak, Mi-Na Kim, Yang Soo Kim, Jun Hee Woo, Jiso Ryu and Nam Joong Kim

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 38, issue 1, pages 53-61
Published in print January 2004 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online January 2004 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/380452
Clinical Features and Outcomes of Bacteremia Caused by Enterococcus casseliflavus and Enterococcus gallinarum: Analysis of 56 Cases

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The clinical significance and virulence potential of Enterococcus casseliflavus/flavescens and Enterococcus gallinarum are still uncertain. We retrospectively analyzed 56 cases of significant bacteremia caused by E. casseliflavus or E. gallinarum. Of these cases, 25 (44.6%) were associated with polymicrobial bacteremia, and 43 (76.8%) were associated with entry via the biliary tract. Resistance to vancomycin was observed in 17 (30.4%) of these 56 patients, and this resistance was significantly associated with E. gallinarum bacteremia (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 10.56; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.41–46.27) and bacteremia without biliary tract origin (AOR, 6.74; 95% CI, 1.44–31.67). The crude mortality rate was 13%, and the bacteremia-related mortality rate was 1.9%. In conclusion, bacteremia due to E. casseliflavus and E. gallinarum is commonly associated with biliary tract disease and may be associated with a low risk of mortality.

Journal Article.  4476 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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