Journal Article

Antimicrobial Resistance Trends and Outbreak Frequency in United States Hospitals

Daniel J. Diekema, Bonnie J. BootsMiller, Thomas E. Vaughn, Robert F. Woolson, Jon W. Yankey, Erika J. Ernst, Stephen D. Flach, Marcia M. Ward, Carrie L. J. Franciscus, Michael A. Pfaller and Bradley N. Doebbeling

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 38, issue 1, pages 78-85
Published in print January 2004 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online January 2004 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/380457
Antimicrobial Resistance Trends and Outbreak Frequency in United States Hospitals

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Immunology
  • Public Health and Epidemiology
  • Microbiology

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

We assessed resistance rates and trends for important antimicrobial-resistant pathogens (oxacillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus [ORSA], vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus species [VRE], ceftazidime-resistant Klebsiella species [K-ESBL], and ciprofloxacin-resistant Escherichia coli [QREC]), the frequency of outbreaks of infection with these resistant pathogens, and the measures taken to control resistance in a stratified national sample of 670 hospitals. Four hundred ninety-four (74%) of 670 surveys were returned. Resistance rates were highest for ORSA (36%), followed by VRE (10%), QREC (6%), and K-ESBL (5%). Two-thirds of hospitals reported increasing ORSA rates, whereas only 4% reported decreasing rates, and 24% reported ORSA outbreaks within the previous year. Most hospitals (87%) reported having implemented measures to rapidly detect resistance, but only ∼50% reported having provided appropriate resources for antimicrobial resistance prevention (53%) or having implemented antimicrobial use guidelines (60%). The most common resistant pathogen in US hospitals is ORSA, which accounts for many recognized outbreaks and is increasing in frequency in most facilities. Current practices to prevent and control antimicrobial resistance are inadequate.

Journal Article.  3841 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.