Journal Article

Use of Total Lymphocyte Count for Monitoring Response to Antiretroviral Therapy

Tanya Schreibman and Gerald Friedland

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 38, issue 2, pages 257-262
Published in print January 2004 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online January 2004 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/380792
Use of Total Lymphocyte Count for Monitoring Response to Antiretroviral Therapy

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Immunology
  • Public Health and Epidemiology
  • Microbiology

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

The CD4 cell count has become a key laboratory measurement in the management of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease. In ideal situations, HIV-infected persons are followed up longitudinally with serial CD4 cell counts to determine disease progression, risk for opportunistic infection, and the need for prophylactic or therapeutic intervention. However, the use of the CD4 cell count in resource-limited settings is often not possible because of lack of availability and high cost. Thus, other laboratory markers have been proposed as substitutes for the CD4 cell count. The data regarding the clinical utility of the total lymphocyte count (TLC) as a potential surrogate marker of immune function in patients with HIV disease are examined. The role of the TLC in the initiation of antiretroviral therapy and opportunistic infection prophylaxis, as well as the role of the TLC in monitoring the response to antiretroviral therapy, are also addressed.

Journal Article.  4087 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.