Journal Article

Lack of Vaccinia Viremia after Smallpox Vaccination

James F. Cummings, Mark E. Polhemus, Clifton Hawkes, Mary Klote, George V. Ludwig and Glenn Wortmann

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 38, issue 3, pages 456-458
Published in print February 2004 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online February 2004 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/381101
Lack of Vaccinia Viremia after Smallpox Vaccination

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Immunology
  • Public Health and Epidemiology
  • Microbiology

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

Although the transmission of certain viral infections (human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis B and C viruses, and West Nile virus) through donated blood products is well described, the risk of transmitting vaccinia virus after smallpox vaccination is unknown. Blood samples from patients receiving the smallpox vaccine were obtained before vaccination; then from one-half of the study group on alternate days for each of the first 10 days after vaccination; then from all patients on days 14 and 21 after vaccination. Samples were analyzed by culture, polymerase chain reaction, and antigen detection (electrochemiluminescence) assay for the presence of vaccinia virus. Two hundred and twenty samples from 28 volunteers were processed by all 3 laboratory detection methods and all were negative for the presence of vaccinia virus (confidence interval, 0%–12.3%). Viremia with vaccinia virus after smallpox vaccination appears to be an uncommon occurrence.

Journal Article.  1595 words. 

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.