Journal Article

Cat-Transmitted Sporotrichosis Epidemic in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil: Description of a Series of Cases

Mônica Bastos de Lima Barros, Armando de Oliveira Schubach, Antônio Carlos Francesconi do Valle, Maria Clara Gutierrez Galhardo, Fátima Conceição-Silva, Tânia Maria Pacheco Schubach, Rosani Santos Reis, Bodo Wanke, Keyla Belizia Feldman Marzochi and Maria José Conceição

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 38, issue 4, pages 529-535
Published in print February 2004 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online February 2004 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/381200
Cat-Transmitted Sporotrichosis Epidemic in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil: Description of a Series of Cases

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Sporotrichosis is the most common subcutaneous mycosis in South America. Classic infection is associated with traumatic inoculation of soil, vegetables, and organic matter contaminated with Sporothrix schenckii. Zoonotic transmission has been described in isolated cases or in small outbreaks. Since 1998, we have been observing an increasing number of cases of sporotrichosis in persons from the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, and surroundings. From 1998 to 2001, 178 cases of culture-proven sporotrichosis had been diagnosed. Female patients predominated, and the median age was 39 years. The most frequent clinical presentation was lymphocutaneous disease. Of the 178 patients, 156 reported domiciliary or professional contact with cats with sporotrichosis, and 97 of these patients had a history of receipt of cat scratch or bite. The patients received itraconazole as first-line treatment. This study suggests that feline transmission of sporotrichosis was associated with a large and long-lasting outbreak of the disease in Rio de Janeiro.

Journal Article.  4674 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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