Journal Article

The Effect of Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy on Dermatologic Disease in a Longitudinal Study of HIV Type 1-Infected Women

Toby Maurer, Lori K. E. Rodrigues, Niloufar Ameli, Nittaya Phanuphak, Stephen J. Gange, Jack DeHovitz, Audrey L. French, Marshall Glesby, Carol Jordan, Ann Khalsa and Nancy A. Hessol

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 38, issue 4, pages 579-584
Published in print February 2004 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online February 2004 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/381264
The Effect of Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy on Dermatologic Disease in a Longitudinal Study of HIV Type 1-Infected Women

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The effect of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) on skin diseases was evaluated in 878 human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected women in the Women's Interagency HIV Study, a multicenter prospective study. HIV-1-infected women receiving HAART were less likely to have eczema, folliculitis, tinea pedis, and xerosis than were women who had not initiated HAART, independent of CD4+ cell count. Participants who had a prior history of a nadir CD4+ cell count of <200 cells/µL and recent CD4+ cell counts of 200–349 cells/µL were more likely to have eczema and xerosis than were women with a nadir CD4+ cell count of >200 cells/µL and recent CD4+ cell counts of >349 cells/µL. An HIV-1 RNA load of >100,000 copies/mL was associated with increased prevalence of herpes zoster infection (odds ratio, 6.10; 95% confidence interval, 2.00–18.65). History of injection drug use was associated with a higher prevalence of onychomycosis, tinea pedis, and xerosis. Molluscum contagiosum was more prevalent among younger women.

Journal Article.  3433 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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