Journal Article

Dramatic Decrease in the Incidence of <i>Salmonella</i> Serotype Enteritidis Infections in 5 FoodNet Sites: 1996–1999

Ruthanne Marcus, Terry Rabatsky-Ehr, Janet C. Mohle-Boetani, Monica Farley, Carlota Medus, Beletshachew Shiferaw, Michael Carter, Shelley Zansky, Malinda Kennedy, Thomas Van Gilder and James L. Hadler

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 38, issue Supplement_3, pages S135-S141
Published in print April 2004 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online April 2004 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/381579
Dramatic Decrease in the Incidence of Salmonella Serotype Enteritidis Infections in 5 FoodNet Sites: 1996–1999

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Salmonella serotype Enteritidis (SE) emerged as the most common Salmonella serotype among infected persons in the United States during the 1980s and 1990s, with infections reaching a peak in 1995. During the past decade, farm-to-table control measures have been instituted in the United States, particularly in regions with the highest incidence of SE infection. We report trends in the incidence of SE in the 5 original surveillance areas of the Foodborne Diseases Active Surveillance Network during 1996–1999: Minnesota, Oregon, and selected counties in California, Connecticut, and Georgia. Overall, the incidence of SE decreased 46% from 1996 to 1999. The greatest decrease was in Connecticut (71%), followed by northern California (50%), Minnesota (46%), and Oregon (13%). Although SE infection remains an important public health concern, there has been a remarkable decrease in its incidence. This decrease may be a result of targeted interventions, including on-farm control measures, refrigeration, and education efforts.

Journal Article.  3726 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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