Journal Article

Invasive <i>Salmonella</i> Infections in the United States, FoodNet, 1996–1999: Incidence, Serotype Distribution, and Outcome

Duc J. Vugia, Michael Samuel, Monica M. Farley, Ruthanne Marcus, Beletshachew Shiferaw, Sue Shallow, Kirk Smith and Frederick J. Angulo

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 38, issue Supplement_3, pages S149-S156
Published in print April 2004 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online April 2004 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/381581
Invasive Salmonella Infections in the United States, FoodNet, 1996–1999: Incidence, Serotype Distribution, and Outcome

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Invasive Salmonella infections are severe and can be life threatening. We analyzed population-based data collected during 1996–1999 by the Foodborne Diseases Active Surveillance Network (FoodNet), to determine the incidences, infecting serotypes, and outcomes of invasive Salmonella infection. We found that the mean annual incidence of invasive salmonellosis was 0.9 cases/100,000 population and was highest among infants (7.8 cases/100,000). The incidence was higher among men than women (1.2 vs. 0.7 cases/100,000; P < .001) and higher among blacks, Asians, and Hispanics than among whites (2.5, 2.0, and 1.3 cases/100,000 population, respectively, vs. 0.4 cases/100,000; all P < .001). Seventy-four percent of cases were caused by 8 Salmonella serotypes: Typhimurium, Typhi, Enteritidis, Heidelberg, Dublin, Paratyphi A, Choleraesuis, and Schwarzengrund. Of 540 persons with invasive infection, 386 (71%) were hospitalized and 29 (5%) died; 13 (45%) of the deaths were among persons aged ⩾60 years. Invasive Salmonella infections are a substantial health problem in the United States and contribute to hospitalizations and deaths.

Journal Article.  5400 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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