Journal Article

Trends in Population-Based Active Surveillance for Shigellosis and Demographic Variability in FoodNet Sites, 1996–1999

Beletshachew Shiferaw, Sue Shallow, Ruthanne Marcus, Suzanne Segler, Dana Soderlund, Felicia P. Hardnett and Thomas Van Gilder

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 38, issue Supplement_3, pages S175-S180
Published in print April 2004 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online April 2004 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/381584
Trends in Population-Based Active Surveillance for Shigellosis and Demographic Variability in FoodNet Sites, 1996–1999

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Shigella is a common cause of diarrhea in the United States, and accurate surveillance is needed to determine the burden of illness that they cause. Active surveillance for culture-confirmed Shigella infection was done as part of the Foodborne Diseases Active Surveillance Network (FoodNet). A total of 4317 cases of shigellosis were reported during 1996–1999 in the original FoodNet surveillance areas. The average annual incidence was 7.4 cases/100,000 population. The incidence was similar during 1996–1998, but it declined in 1999 to 5.0 cases/100,000 population. State-to-state variability was seen in the incidence of shigellosis. Higher incidence was observed in California and Georgia. Shigella sonnei accounted for 70% of the infections, followed by Shigella flexneri (24%). Compared with other age groups, the incidence was highest among children aged 1–4 years of (36.3 cases/100,000 population). Marked demographic differences were observed between infections with S. sonnei and S. flexneri.

Journal Article.  3177 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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