Journal Article

Population-Based Surveillance for <i>Yersinia enterocolitica</i> Infections in FoodNet Sites, 1996–1999: Higher Risk of Disease in Infants and Minority Populations

Susan M. Ray, Shama D. Ahuja, Paul A. Blake, Monica M. Farley, Michael Samuel, Therese Fiorentino, Ellen Swanson, Maureen Cassidy, Jenny C. Lay and Thomas Van Gilder

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 38, issue Supplement_3, pages S181-S189
Published in print April 2004 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online April 2004 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/381585
Population-Based Surveillance for Yersinia enterocolitica Infections in FoodNet Sites, 1996–1999: Higher Risk of Disease in Infants and Minority Populations

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Active surveillance for laboratory-confirmed Yersinia enterocolitica (YE) infections was conducted at 5 Foodborne Diseases Active Surveillance Network (FoodNet) sites in the United States during 1996–1999. The annual incidence averaged 0.9 cases/100,000 population. After adjusting for missing data, the average annual incidence by race/ethnicity was 3.2 cases/100,000 population among black persons, 1.5 cases/100,000 population among Asian persons, 0.6 cases/100,000 population among Hispanic persons, and 0.4 cases/100,000 population among white persons. Incidence increased with decreasing age in all race/ethnicity groups. Black infants had the highest incidence (141.9 cases/100,000 population; range, 8.7 cases/100,000 population in Minnesota to 207.0 cases/100,000 population in Georgia). Seasonal variations in incidence, with a marked peak in December, were noted only among black persons. YE infections should be suspected in black children with gastroenteritis, particularly during November–February. Culturing for YE should be part of routine testing of stool specimens by clinical laboratories serving populations at risk, especially during the winter months.

Journal Article.  5047 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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