Journal Article

Burden of Self-Reported Acute Diarrheal Illness in FoodNet Surveillance Areas, 1998–1999

Beth Imhoff, Dale Morse, Beletshachew Shiferaw, Marguerite Hawkins, Duc Vugia, Susan Lance-Parker, James Hadler, Carlota Medus, Malinda Kennedy, Matthew R. Moore and Thomas Van Gilder

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 38, issue Supplement_3, pages S219-S226
Published in print April 2004 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online April 2004 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/381590
Burden of Self-Reported Acute Diarrheal Illness in FoodNet Surveillance Areas, 1998–1999

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To assess trends in the burden of acute diarrheal illness, the Foodborne Diseases Active Surveillance Network (FoodNet) conducted a population-based telephone survey during 1998–1999, using a random-digit-dialing, single-stage Genesys-ID sampling method. During the 12-month study period, 12,755 persons were interviewed; after the exclusion of persons with chronic diarrheal illnesses, 12,075 persons were included in the analysis; 6% (n = 645) reported having experienced an acute diarrheal illness at some point during the 4 weeks preceding the interview (annualized rate, 0.72 episodes per person-year). Rates of diarrheal illness were highest among children aged <5 years (1.1 episodes per person-year) and were lowest in persons aged ⩾65 years (0.32 episodes per person-year). Twenty-one percent of persons with acute diarrheal illness sought medical care as a result of their illness. Diarrheal illness imposes a considerable burden on the US population and health care system.

Journal Article.  4559 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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