Journal Article

Prior Antimicrobial Agent Use Increases the Risk of Sporadic Infections with Multidrug-Resistant <i>Salmonella enterica</i> Serotype Typhimurium: A FoodNet Case-Control Study, 1996–1997

M. Kathleen Glynn, Vasudha Reddy, Lori Hutwagner, Therese Rabatsky-Ehr, Beletshachew Shiferaw, Duc J. Vugia, Suzanne Segler, Jeff Bender, Timothy J. Barrett and Frederick J. Angulo

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 38, issue Supplement_3, pages S227-S236
Published in print April 2004 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online April 2004 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/381591
Prior Antimicrobial Agent Use Increases the Risk of Sporadic Infections with Multidrug-Resistant Salmonella enterica Serotype Typhimurium: A FoodNet Case-Control Study, 1996–1997

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Several strains of multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella serotype Typhimurium, including MDR S. Typhimurium definitive type 104, cause almost 10% of Salmonella infections among humans in the United States. To determine the risk factors for acquiring sporadic MDR S. Typhimurium infection, we conducted a population-based, case-control study using data from the Foodborne Diseases Active Surveillance Network (FoodNet) during 1996–1997. S. Typhimurium isolates from 5 FoodNet surveillance areas (California, Connecticut, Georgia, Minnesota, and Oregon) were tested for antimicrobial resistance and phage typing. Telephone interviews were conducted with ill persons and matched control subjects. Compared with both control subjects and patients infected with pansensitive strains of S. Typhimurium, patients with MDR S. Typhimurium infection were significantly more likely to have received an antimicrobial agent, particularly an agent to which the Salmonella isolate was resistant, during the 4 weeks preceding illness onset. Prudent antimicrobial agent use among humans and among veterinarians and food-animal producers is necessary to reduce the burden of drug-resistant salmonellosis in humans.

Journal Article.  6783 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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