Journal Article

Fluoroquinolone-Resistant <i>Campylobacter</i> Infections: Eating Poultry Outside of the Home and Foreign Travel Are Risk Factors

Heidi D. Kassenborg, Kirk E. Smith, Duc J. Vugia, Therese Rabatsky-Ehr, Martha R. Bates, Michael A. Carter, Nellie B. Dumas, Maureen P. Cassidy, Nina Marano, Robert V. Tauxe and Frederick J. Angulo

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 38, issue Supplement_3, pages S279-S284
Published in print April 2004 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online April 2004 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/381597
Fluoroquinolone-Resistant Campylobacter Infections: Eating Poultry Outside of the Home and Foreign Travel Are Risk Factors

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A 12-month, population-based, case-control study of Campylobacter infections was conducted at Foodborne Disease Active Surveillance Network surveillance areas during 1998–1999. Of 858 Campylobacter isolates tested for antimicrobial susceptibility to the fluoroquinolone ciprofloxacin, 94 (11%) were resistant. Travel outside of the United States was reported by 27 (42%) of 64 patients with fluoroquinolone-resistant Campylobacter infection and by 51 (9%) of 582 patients with fluoroquinolone-susceptible Campylobacter infection (odds ratio [OR], 7.6; 95% confidence interval [CI], 4.3–13.4). When patients with domestically acquired fluoroquinolone-resistant Campylobacter infection were compared with matched healthy control subjects in a multivariate analysis, those infected were 10 times more likely to have eaten chicken or turkey cooked at a commercial establishment (18 [55%] of 33 case patients vs. 7 [21%] of 33 controls; matched OR, 10.0; 95% CI, 1.3–78). Although travel outside of the United States was associated with fluoroquinolone-resistant Campylobacter infection, most infections among study participants were domestically acquired. This study provides additional evidence that poultry is an important source of domestically acquired fluoroquinolone-resistant Campylobacter infection. Control measures should include efforts to improve food handling in commercial establishments.

Journal Article.  3617 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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