Journal Article

Risk Factors for Sporadic <i>Campylobacter</i> Infection in the United States: A Case-Control Study in FoodNet Sites

Cindy R. Friedman, Robert M. Hoekstra, Michael Samuel, Ruthanne Marcus, Jeffrey Bender, Beletshachew Shiferaw, Sudha Reddy, Shama Desai Ahuja, Debra L. Helfrick, Felicia Hardnett, Michael Carter, Bridget Anderson and Robert V. Tauxe

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 38, issue Supplement_3, pages S285-S296
Published in print April 2004 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online April 2004 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1086/381598
Risk Factors for Sporadic Campylobacter Infection in the United States: A Case-Control Study in FoodNet Sites

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Campylobacter is a common cause of gastroenteritis in the United States. We conducted a population-based case-control study to determine risk factors for sporadic Campylobacter infection. During a 12-month study, we enrolled 1316 patients with culture-confirmed Campylobacter infections from 7 states, collecting demographic, clinical, and exposure data using a standardized questionnaire. We interviewed 1 matched control subject for each case patient. Thirteen percent of patients had traveled abroad. In multivariate analysis of persons who had not traveled, the largest population attributable fraction (PAF) of 24% was related to consumption of chicken prepared at a restaurant. The PAF for consumption of nonpoultry meat that was prepared at a restaurant was also large (21%); smaller proportions of illness were associated with other food and nonfood exposures. Efforts to reduce contamination of poultry with Campylobacter should benefit public health. Restaurants should improve food-handling practices, ensure adequate cooking of meat and poultry, and consider purchasing poultry that has been treated to reduce Campylobacter contamination.

Journal Article.  6098 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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