Journal Article

Differences in Potency of Intravenous Polyspecific Immunoglobulin G against Streptococcal and Staphylococcal Superantigens: Implications for Therapy of Toxic Shock Syndrome

Jessica Darenberg, Bo Söderquist, Birgitta Henriques Normark and Anna Norrby-Teglund

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 38, issue 6, pages 836-842
Published in print March 2004 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online March 2004 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/381979
Differences in Potency of Intravenous Polyspecific Immunoglobulin G against Streptococcal and Staphylococcal Superantigens: Implications for Therapy of Toxic Shock Syndrome

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Administration of intravenous polyspecific immunoglobulin G (IVIG) has been proposed as adjunctive therapy for toxic shock syndrome caused by Streptococcus pyogenes or Staphylococcus aureus. We investigated whether superantigen-containing culture supernatants prepared from streptococcal isolates (n = 21) and staphylococcal isolates (n = 20) from cases of severe sepsis were inhibited to an equal extent by IVIG in proliferation experiments that used human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. All 3 IVIG preparations tested were highly efficient in neutralizing the superantigens, and most supernatants were completely inhibited at concentrations ranging from 0.05 to 2.5 mg IVIG/mL. An important finding was that culture supernatants from S. pyogenes isolates were consistently inhibited to a greater extent than those of S. aureus isolates (P < .01). The findings demonstrate that staphylococcal superantigens are not inhibited as efficiently as streptococcal superantigens by IVIG, and, hence, a higher dose of IVIG may be required for therapy of staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome in order to achieve protective titers and clinical efficacy.

Journal Article.  3702 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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