Journal Article

Clinical, Epidemiologic, and Molecular Evaluation of a Clonal Outbreak of Methicillin-Resistant <i>Staphylococcus aureus</i> Infection

Lisa S. Young, Françoise Perdreau-Remington and Lisa G. Winston

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 38, issue 8, pages 1075-1083
Published in print April 2004 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online April 2004 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/382361
Clinical, Epidemiologic, and Molecular Evaluation of a Clonal Outbreak of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Infection

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San Francisco General Hospital (San Francisco, CA) experienced an overall increase in the recovery of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates that were shown by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis to have a genotype (genotype A1) that was new to this institution. We performed a case-control study to identify risk factors for acquiring genotype A1 MRSA infection from 1 October 2001 to 19 July 2002. Patients with genotype A1 MRSA infection were compared with 2 control groups: MRSA-infected control patients (i.e., patients with infection due to non—genotype A1 MRSA) and non—MRSA infected control patients (i.e., hospitalized patients without MRSA infection). There were 41 case patients infected with genotype A1 MRSA, 99 control patients infected with MRSA, and 41 control patients without MRSA infection. Pneumonia, surgical wound infections, and line infections occurred more frequently among case patients. Intensive care unit exposure and invasive procedures conferred the greatest risk for genotype A1 MRSA infection in multivariate models. Case patients were not associated with increased mortality, after adjusting for age, comorbidities, and intensive care unit exposure. Genotype A1 MRSA caused a large nosocomial outbreak of infection that was associated with distinct risk factors and clinical manifestations.

Journal Article.  4556 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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