Journal Article

Penicillin and Macrolide Resistance in Pneumococcal Pneumonia: Does In Vitro Resistance Affect Clinical Outcomes?

Constance D. Rothermel

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 38, issue Supplement_4, pages S346-S349
Published in print May 2004 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online May 2004 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/382691
Penicillin and Macrolide Resistance in Pneumococcal Pneumonia: Does In Vitro Resistance Affect Clinical Outcomes?

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Immunology
  • Public Health and Epidemiology
  • Microbiology

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

In vitro resistance to antimicrobial agents is escalating among pathogens responsible for the most serious respiratory tract infections. Some reports have suggested that this has direct clinical implications. Because of penicillin and macrolide resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae, current guidelines for the initial treatment of respiratory tract infections advocate less reliance on the use of either of these classes of drugs in single-agent therapy. Recent studies that have assessed the impact of β-lactam and macrolide resistance on clinical outcomes in community-acquired pneumonia fail to provide incontrovertible evidence for a direct link between in vitro resistance and treatment failure. However, there are anecdotal reports of breakthrough bacteremia due to macrolide-resistant pneumococci among patients receiving macrolide therapy, unlike the situation for β-lactams and penicillin-resistant pneumococci. Continued efforts, including in vitro surveillance, appropriate antibiotic use campaigns, and immunization programs, will be important in limiting the spread of drug-resistant S. pneumoniae.

Journal Article.  2779 words. 

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.