Journal Article

Microbiological Data for Patients with Febrile Neutropenia

Akihisa Kanamaru and Youichi Tatsumi

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 39, issue Supplement_1, pages S7-S10
Published in print July 2004 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online July 2004 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/383042
Microbiological Data for Patients with Febrile Neutropenia

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The pattern of bacterial infections and antimicrobial susceptibility has changed significantly during the past 20–30 years. The causative organisms for bacteremia or fungemia identified at Kinki University Hospital in 1985–1996 were compared with the isolates identified during 1997–2002. The prevalence of gram-negative organisms decreased, whereas the prevalence of gram-positive organisms increased. Staphylococcal species predominated in the second period, accounting for 22% of isolates, and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) increased from 5% to 14% of isolates. Pseudomonas aeruginosa ranked second, although the prevalence decreased in the second period compared with the first. Candida species were also relatively frequent (11%). Enterococcal species had an 8% prevalence. A comparison of all culture isolates showed that gram-negative isolates still predominated among the general patient population, whereas almost equal prevalence was observed in patients with hematological diseases. MRSA was the organism most frequently isolated in the general patient population, followed by P. aeruginosa. Among staphylococcal species, MRSA accounted for as much as 90% of isolates.

Journal Article.  1774 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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