Journal Article

Enterotoxin B Is the Predominant Toxin Involved in Staphylococcal Scarlet Fever in Taiwan

Chih-Chien Wang, Wen-Tsung Lo, Chen-Fang Hsu and Mong-Ling Chu

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 38, issue 10, pages 1498-1502
Published in print May 2004 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online May 2004 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/392501
Enterotoxin B Is the Predominant Toxin Involved in Staphylococcal Scarlet Fever in Taiwan

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This study retrospectively reviewed all pediatric cases of staphylococcal scarlet fever (SSF) that occurred during a 10-year period in a 1400-bed tertiary medical center in northern Taiwan. All 20 cases of SSF occurred in previously healthy individuals. Skin and soft-tissue infections predominated among children from whom Staphylococcus aureus was isolated. Polymerase chain reaction testing was used to detect known staphylococcal toxin genes, and of the isolates studied, most (18 [90%] of 20) contained only the staphylococcal enterotoxin B. One of the other strains was positive for staphylococcal enterotoxin A only, and the last strain was positive for both staphylococcal enterotoxin G and staphylococcal enterotoxin I. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis identified a small cluster of isolates (6 [30%] of 20) that were genetically related, but these strains came from epidemiologically unrelated patients during a 3-year period.

Journal Article.  2230 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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