Journal Article

Pertussis-Specific Cell-Mediated and Humoral Immunity in Adolescents 3 Years after Booster Immunization with Acellular Pertussis Vaccine

Kati J. Edelman, Qiushui He, Johanna P. Makinen, Marjo S. Haanpera, Nhu Nguyen Tran Minh, Lode Schuerman, Joanne Wolter and Jussi A. Mertsola

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 39, issue 2, pages 179-185
Published in print July 2004 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online July 2004 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/421943
Pertussis-Specific Cell-Mediated and Humoral Immunity in Adolescents 3 Years after Booster Immunization with Acellular Pertussis Vaccine

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We evaluated pertussis-specific cell-mediated immunity (CMI) and humoral immunity in adolescents 3 years after they received an acellular pertussis booster immunization. Two hundred sixty-four adolescents were examined for immunoglobulin G antibodies, and 49 were examined for CMI against Bordetella pertussis antigens 40 months after receiving the booster. A control group of similarly aged adolescents who had received diphtheria and tetanus vaccination 3 years earlier was included for comparison. Pertussis-specific CMI persisted at greater than prebooster immunization levels. Although they had decreased by the 3-year follow-up, antibody levels remained significantly higher than prebooster immunization levels. Antibodies against pertussis antigens and CMI against filamentous hemagglutinin and pertactin were significantly higher in vaccinated adolescents than in control subjects. The acellular pertussis booster immunization provides long-term CMI and humoral immunity lasting for ⩾3 years. The significantly higher immunity observed in the diphtheria, tetanus, and acellular pertussis vaccine recipients, compared with that in control subjects, indicates that these responses are more likely to have resulted from the booster immunization than from the boosting effects of natural B. pertussis infection.

Journal Article.  4717 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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