Journal Article

The Impact of Meningococcal Serogroup C Conjugate Vaccine in Scotland

John D. Mooney, Peter Christie, Chris Robertson and Stuart C. Clarke

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 39, issue 3, pages 349-356
Published in print August 2004 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online August 2004 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/421947
The Impact of Meningococcal Serogroup C Conjugate Vaccine in Scotland

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The increasing number of cases of serogroup C meningococcal disease in Scotland in the late 1990s coincided with the availability of a new meningococcal conjugate serogroup C (MCC) vaccine that, from 1999 onwards, was offered to all individuals aged <20 years. Annual incidence rates between 1994 and 2003 were calculated in 3 age groups (<5 years old; 5–19 years old; and ⩾20 years old), and Poisson regression models were used to verify disease trends over time. Dramatic reductions (P < .05) in the incidence of serogroup C meningococcal disease were seen in target age groups: from 15.8 incidents per 100,000 subjects in 1999 (95% confidence interval [CI], 11.3–20.3) to 0.7 incidents per 100,000 subjects in 2001 (95% CI, -0.3 to 1.6), for subjects <5 years old, and from 6.7 incidents per 100,000 subjects in 1999 (95% CI, 5.1–8.3) to 1.5 incidents per 100,000 subjects in 2001 (95% CI, 0.7–2.3), for subjects 5–19 years old. An increasing incidence of serogroup B meningococcal disease in individuals 5–19 years old was clearly established before the campaign began. A 30% decrease in the case-fatality rate for individuals <20 years old was not significant (P = .1598). The MCC vaccine program has been highly effective in Scotland, leading to substantial reductions in serogroup C meningococcal disease and meningococcal mortality, with no adverse effects on other groups.

Journal Article.  4286 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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