Journal Article

Disseminated Infection with <i>Bartonella henselae</i> as a Cause of Spontaneous Splenic Rupture

D. Daybell, C. D. Paddock, S. R. Zaki, J. A. Comer, D. Woodruff, K. J. Hansen and J. E. Peacock

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 39, issue 3, pages e21-e24
Published in print August 2004 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online August 2004 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/422001
Disseminated Infection with Bartonella henselae as a Cause of Spontaneous Splenic Rupture

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A 65-year-old man developed massive hemoperitoneum secondary to spontaneous splenic rupture. Histopathological analysis of the spleen demonstrated necrotizing granulomas. Results of serological tests indicated infection with a species of Bartonella, and immunohistochemical staining established Bartonella henselae as the cause of splenitis. To our knowledge, this represents the first reported case of spontaneous splenic rupture caused by infection with a species of Bartonella.

Journal Article.  1944 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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