Journal Article

Longitudinal Effect of Antiretroviral Therapy on Markers of Hepatic Toxicity: Impact of Hepatitis C Coinfection

Audrey L. French, Lorie Benning, Kathryn Anastos, Michael Augenbraun, Marek Nowicki, Kunthavi Sathasivam and Norah A. Terrault

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 39, issue 3, pages 402-410
Published in print August 2004 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online August 2004 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/422142
Longitudinal Effect of Antiretroviral Therapy on Markers of Hepatic Toxicity: Impact of Hepatitis C Coinfection

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To characterize longitudinal hepatic toxicity of antiretroviral therapy in HIV-infected women with and without hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, we measured alanine and aspartate aminotransferase values among women initiating highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). For 312 HIV/HCV coinfected women who received HAART for a mean of 1.8 years, the prevalence of elevated aminotransferase levels >3 times and >5 times the upper limit of normal (ULN) was low (<12% and <4%, respectively), and the prevalence of elevated aminotransferase levels declined over time. When we analyzed trends in aminotransferase levels according to type of HAART received among HCV-infected and uninfected women, we found that mean aminotransferase levels declined among 539 women receiving therapy with protease inhibitors (decreases of 5.34%–4.23% of the ULN per year; P values for trend of .007–.06), but mean values among 128 women receiving therapy with nonnucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitors remained stable (from decreases of 1.65% to increases of 7.57% of the ULN per year; P values of .19–.71). Our findings lend support to assertions that antiretroviral therapy is safe for women with HCV infection.

Journal Article.  4734 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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