Journal Article

Combination Antifungal Therapy for Invasive Aspergillosis

Kieren A. Marr, Michael Boeckh, Rachel A. Carter, Hyung Woo Kim and Lawrence Corey

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 39, issue 6, pages 797-802
Published in print September 2004 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online September 2004 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/423380
Combination Antifungal Therapy for Invasive Aspergillosis

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Background. Aspergillosis therapy with amphotericin, azoles, or echinocandins is associated with substantial mortality, ranging from 30% to 80%, depending on the stage of infection and the host's underlying disease. The results of in vitro studies and animal models suggest that combination therapy with azoles and echinocandins may have additive activity against Aspergillus species.

Methods. We evaluated the outcomes of patients with aspergillosis who experienced failure of initial therapy with amphotericin B formulations and received either voriconazole (n = 31) or a combination of voriconazole and caspofungin (n = 16) for salvage therapy.

Results. The combination of voriconazole and caspofungin was associated with improved 3-month survival rate, compared with voriconazole alone (hazard ratio [HR], 0.42; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.17–1.1; P = .048). In multivariable models, salvage therapy with the combination of voriconazole and caspofungin was associated with reduced mortality, compared with therapy with voriconazole (HR, 0.28; 95% CI, 0.28–0.92; P = .011), independent of other prognostic variables (e.g., receipt of transplant and type of conditioning therapy). The probability of death due to aspergillosis was lowest in patients who received the combination regimen.

Conclusions. Randomized trials are warranted to determine whether this combination should be used as primary therapy for aspergillosis.

Journal Article.  3253 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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