Journal Article

Bloodstream Infections Caused by <i>Enterobacter</i> Species: Predictors of 30-Day Mortality Rate and Impact of Broad-Spectrum Cephalosporin Resistance on Outcome

Cheol-In Kang, Sung-Han Kim, Wan Beom Park, Ki-Deok Lee, Hong-Bin Kim, Myoung-don Oh, Eui-Chong Kim and Kang-Won Choe

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 39, issue 6, pages 812-818
Published in print September 2004 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online September 2004 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/423382
Bloodstream Infections Caused by Enterobacter Species: Predictors of 30-Day Mortality Rate and Impact of Broad-Spectrum Cephalosporin Resistance on Outcome

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Immunology
  • Public Health and Epidemiology
  • Microbiology

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

Background. Enterobacter species have become increasingly important nosocomial pathogens. However, resistance to cephalosporins often complicates the treatment of Enterobacter infection. This study was conducted to evaluate the predictors of mortality and the impact of cephalosporin resistance on outcome in patients with Enterobacter bacteremia.

Methods. A total of 183 patients with Enterobacter bacteremia were retrospectively analyzed. Broad-spectrum cephalosporin resistance was defined as in vitro resistance to cefotaxime or ceftazidime. The main outcome measure was the 30-day mortality rate.

Results. Of 183 patients, 86 (47%) had bacteremia caused by broad-spectrum cephalosporin-resistant Enterobacter species, and their infections were classified as resistant. The 30-day mortality rate of patients with resistant infections (the resistant group) was significantly higher than that of patients with susceptible infections (the susceptible group) (33.7% vs. 18.6%; P = .021). When the 30-day mortality rates were compared according to the primary sites of infection and underlying conditions, the 30-day mortality rates of the resistant group were significantly higher than those of the susceptible group, in patients with an unknown primary site of infection, or in patients with septic shock. Multivariate analysis showed that broad-spectrum cephalosporin resistance was one of the independent risk factors associated with 30-day mortality (odds ratio [OR], 3.69; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.01–13.52; P = .049). Presentation with septic shock and an increasing Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score were also independent risk factors for mortality (OR, 59.91 [95% CI, 14.93–240.15; P < .001] and 1.52 [95% CI, 1.24–1.86; P < .001], respectively).

Conclusions. Broad-spectrum cephalosporin resistance adversely affects the outcome of patients with Enterobacter bacteremia, especially those with an unknown primary site of infection and those with septic shock.

Journal Article.  3420 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.