Journal Article

CCR2 Genotype and Disease Progression in a Treated Population of HIV Type 1–Infected Women

Sean Philpott, Harold Burger, Patrick M. Tarwater, Ming Lu, Stephen J. Gange, Kathryn Anastos, Mardge Cohen, Ruth M. Greenblatt, Andrea Kovacs, Howard Minkoff, Mary Young, Paolo Miotti, Michelle Dupuis and Barbara Weiser

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 39, issue 6, pages 861-865
Published in print September 2004 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online September 2004 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/423386
CCR2 Genotype and Disease Progression in a Treated Population of HIV Type 1–Infected Women

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Both antiretroviral therapy and the human coreceptor polymorphism CCR2-V64I slow progression of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) disease. To examine the effect of V64I on disease progression in patients receiving therapy, we determined CCR2 genotypes in the Women's Interagency HIV Study cohort. We studied 2047 HIV-1—infected women, most of whom initiated treatment during the study. No association was seen between CCR2 genotype and either disease progression or therapeutic response, suggesting that the benefits of treatment most likely overshadow the salutary effects of the V64I polymorphism.

Journal Article.  2176 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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