Journal Article

Presurgical Maggot Debridement of Soft Tissue Wounds Is Associated with Decreased Rates of Postoperative Infection

Ronald A. Sherman and Kathleen J. Shimoda

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 39, issue 7, pages 1067-1070
Published in print October 2004 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online October 2004 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/423806
Presurgical Maggot Debridement of Soft Tissue Wounds Is Associated with Decreased Rates of Postoperative Infection

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Postoperative complications were assessed for all patients who received presurgical maggot debridement therapy (MDT) and for a matched group of patients who did not. Ten wounds were debrided by maggots within 1–17 days prior to surgical closure. Debridement was effective in all cases, and there were no postoperative wound infections. Six (32%) of 19 wounds not treated presurgically with MDT developed postoperative wound infections (95% CI, 10%–54%; P < .05). Presurgical MDT was effective in preparing the wound bed for surgical closure, without increased risk of postsurgical wound infection.

Journal Article.  2575 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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