Journal Article

Bacterial Vaginosis and Anaerobic Bacteria Are Associated with Endometritis

Catherine L. Haggerty, Sharon L. Hillier, Debra C. Bass and Roberta B. Ness

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 39, issue 7, pages 990-995
Published in print October 2004 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online October 2004 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/423963
Bacterial Vaginosis and Anaerobic Bacteria Are Associated with Endometritis

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Immunology
  • Public Health and Epidemiology
  • Microbiology

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

Background. Chlamydia trachomatis and/or Neisseria gonorrhoeae account for approximately one-third to one-half of pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) cases. Thus, up to 70% of cases have an unknown, nongonococcal/nonchlamydial microbial etiology.

Methods. We investigated the associations of N. gonorrhoeae, C. trachomatis, bacterial vaginosis, anaerobic bacteria, facultative bacteria, and lactobacilli with endometritis among 278 women with complete endometrial histology and culture from the PID Evaluation and Clinical Health Study.

Results. Women with acute endometritis were less likely to have H2O2-producing Lactobacillus species (odds ratio [OR], 0.1; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.01–0.8) and more likely to be infected with C. trachomatis (OR, 16.2; 95% CI, 4.6–56.6), N. gonorrhoeae (OR, 11.6; 95% CI, 4.5–29.9), diphtheroids (OR, 5.0; 95% CI, 2.1–12.2), black-pigmented gram-negative rods (OR, 3.1; 95% CI, 1.4–7.0), and anaerobic gram-positive cocci (OR, 2.1; 95% CI, 1.0–4.3) and to have bacterial vaginosis (OR, 2.4; 95% CI, 1.3–4.3).

Conclusions. We conclude that bacterial vaginosis—associated organisms are frequent among women with PID. Because these organisms were strongly associated with endometritis, we recommend that all women with PID be treated with regimens that include metronidazole.

Journal Article.  3653 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.