Journal Article

Resurgence of Lymphogranuloma Venereum in Western Europe: An Outbreak of <i>Chlamydia trachomatis</i> Serovar L<sub>2</sub> Proctitis in The Netherlands among Men Who Have Sex with Men

Rutger F. Nieuwenhuis, Jacobus M. Ossewaarde, Hannelore M. Götz, Jan Dees, H. Bing Thio, Maarten G. J. Thomeer, Jan C. den Hollander, Martino H. A. Neumann and Willem I. van der Meijden

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 39, issue 7, pages 996-1003
Published in print October 2004 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online October 2004 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/423966
Resurgence of Lymphogranuloma Venereum in Western Europe: An Outbreak of Chlamydia trachomatis Serovar L2 Proctitis in The Netherlands among Men Who Have Sex with Men

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Immunology
  • Public Health and Epidemiology
  • Microbiology

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

Background. Lymphogranuloma venereum (LGV) is a sexually transmitted disease (STD) and is rare in the Western world. Recently, 3 men who have sex with men presented with LGV proctitis at the Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. We investigated a possible outbreak in a sexual network of men who have sex with men (MSM).

Methods. After active case finding, a total of 15 men presented and were investigated. Serum antibody titers to Chlamydia trachomatis were determined. Urine and rectum specimens were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the presence of C. trachomatis. C. trachomatis—positive specimens were genotyped to detect the specific C. trachomatis serovars. All subjects underwent routine STD screening. Sociodemographic, clinical, and endoscopic characteristics were evaluated.

Results. Thirteen subjects had high immunoglobulin (Ig) G and IgA titers to C. trachomatis, suggesting an invasive infection. Rectal specimens of 12 subjects were PCR-positive for C. trachomatis. All urine specimens were negative. Genotyping revealed serovars L2 (n = 8) and L1 (n = 1). An ulcerative proctitis was found in all subjects obtaining sigmoidoscopy (n = 9). Eleven of 13 subjects with an LGV diagnosis were seropositive for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), 6 had another concomitant STD, and 1 had recently acquired a hepatitis C virus infection. Further sexual contacts were reported from The Netherlands, Germany, Belgium, the United Kingdom, and France.

Conclusions. We revealed an outbreak of LGV proctitis among MSM in The Netherlands. The ulcerous character favors transmission of HIV, other STDs, and blood-borne diseases. From a public health perspective, it seems important to increase the awareness of possible LGV in MSM with symptomatic proctitis.

Journal Article.  4072 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.